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5 Tips to Beat Your Biggest Business Obstacles

Written by Randy Taussig on June 8, 2017

The ability to solve substantive business challenges could be the most important skill your leadership team must master. It can either propel your business forward at light speed or, if done poorly, keep you orbiting through chaos and frustration.

Beating business obstacles is one of the most difficult skills to master, but when you do, magic happens!

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Is Your Business Running on Autopilot?

Written by Randy Taussig on May 8, 2017

The autopilot can be an aviator’s BEST friend. It’s precise, alleviates workload, and provides good peace of mind. All positive factors, but if the pilot isn’t careful, it could lead to big trouble!

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Are You Solving Stubborn Business Problems With a Lawnmower?

Written by Wayne Kurzen on March 23, 2017

Growing up, one of my chores was to mow the yard. In the summer, our yard would break out in a sea of yellow dandelions. You can make dandelions disappear by simply mowing the yard, but within a few days – the yellow sea of flowers reappears. Just like some of your company's most stubborn issues.

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Why You Need to Solve Business Issues Slowly

Written by Mike Paton on February 6, 2017

One night this holiday season, my wife and I were wrapping gifts for our family. When a large pile of brightly colored packages sat beside each of us, we stood back to admire our handiwork. Kate’s packages were beautiful – crisply wrapped, carefully secured with beautiful ribbons that matched the wrapping paper, each package festooned with tidy little bows. My packages were technically covered (mostly) with wrapping paper and tape. But they didn’t really look…finished.

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Your Business May Be Growing Bad Apples

Written by Kurt Schneiber on September 22, 2016

Have you ever picked apples at an apple orchard? Trees burgeoning with plump, perfectly shaped apples, ripe for the picking. Growing up in California, we had such a prolific tree in the backyard of our house. During August and early September, Mom would send me out to pick the apples and gather up the strays lying on the ground. I’d haul them into the house with a bushel basket and Mom would turn most of them into applesauce. The very best specimens were sliced up, covered with dough and baked into Mom’s excellent apple pie.

Most of the apples, hanging enticingly from the branches, looked perfect. Or at least until you grabbed one and studied it more carefully. You know, one side of the apple looked great, but when you turned it over you’d find a wormhole or a deep bruise. Damaged goods.

But how many times have you taken a bite before performing your due diligence—checking it out from every angle?

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