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What Relationship Do You Have With Your Issues List?

Written by Mike Paton on April 26, 2018

After a full and productive Annual Season with my clients, I’m always left reflecting on some common themes. This year, what resonated most was the relationship between members of a leadership team and a company’s Issues List. That reflection led me to a question every leader should ask:

"What verb describes how I most frequently impact our company’s Issues List?"

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The Elephant In The Room

Written by Ed Callahan on April 12, 2018

Nobody talks about the elephant in the room. It’s too uncomfortable. “It’s too embarrassing,” you think, “If I bring that subject up, then everyone will know about it.” But here’s the thing – people know about the elephant in the room, and ignoring it is causing more problems than it’s solving.

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Get More from Your Meetings with a Powerful Pause

Written by Mike Paton on March 5, 2018

All companies running on EOS® follow the practice of having a weekly Level 10 Meeting™. I’ve seen many companies do these meetings, and one huge mistake keeps rearing its ugly head when clients get to the Customer and Employee Headlines, and again when they get to the Issues List. They launch right in and wind up missing the real stuff.

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Issues, To-Do’s, and Rocks...Oh My!

Written by Mike Paton on November 13, 2017

To help you manage the complexity of your business and all of the “stuff” going on, I highly recommend the discipline of choosing only one of three options for any problem, idea, commitment, or opportunity, i.e., “stuff.”

Mastering the art of compartmentalizing will help you free up energy and time for yourself, your team, and your company – while maximizing your efficiency and productivity. You'll execute better, become more efficient, and FOCUS your team's energy.

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The Power of the Issues List

Written by Ken DeWitt on November 9, 2017

Two workers in the Operations Department of a company were working one Friday evening to push out a late delivery. One saw a problem about to happen and said to the other, “Look at that! We can’t ship this out. This order is not correct.”

“You’re right,” said the other, “But neither one of us can fix it. Nobody can fix it until Monday. The boss told us to get this shipment out tonight, and we’ll get yelled at if we don’t. Remember what he did the last time something like this happened?”

So out the order went, and in came an angry customer complaint two days later when the order was delivered. And then out went a chunk of the profits from the order because it cost the company three times as much to fix the error than it would have to get it right the first time.

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