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Leading in a 90-Day World™

Written by Randy Taussig on October 4, 2018

I just returned from the EOS Worldwide QCE™ (Quarterly Collaboration Exchange™) where I met with other EOS Implementers™ from across the globe to collaborate on our work and set new goals for this quarter. What better time to rehash a previous blog on tackling your business 90 days at a time?

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Reviewing Core Processes

Written by Jeanet Wade on September 27, 2018

After completing the 3-Step Process Documenter™, and before the Core Process can be Followed By All (FBA), it's a best practice to do a review of the processes as a leadership team.

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5 Tips for Building Out Your Accountability Chart

Written by Jonathan Smith on June 25, 2018

One of the first things an EOS Implementer™ does when working with clients is to determine the right structure for the organization using the Accountability Chart. While this can be a straightforward exercise for your senior leadership team, some of your team members may have difficulty when it's time to build out the Accountability Chart for their own departments.

Here are a few tips to help you navigate this process with your team.

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It Takes All Kinds

Written by CJ DuBe' on June 21, 2018

Do you ever get frustrated with people on your leadership team while solving problems or brainstorming ideas? They may ask too many questions, jump to conclusions too fast, are too quiet, or are always a pessimist. Do you sometimes wish they all had your “MO” when discussing these things? Wouldn’t that be great? Or would it?

You might think it’s best to have all optimists on your leadership team or that it might be best to have all innovators or all realists, when in reality, my experience, after having observed almost 100 leadership teams identify, discuss, and solve issues, is that you’ll actually benefit by having a balance of all types.

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Are You Solving the Wrong Issues?

Written by Connie Chwan on June 7, 2018

The most common challenge leadership teams encounter as they learn to IDS™ (Identify, Discuss, Solve) issues is that they move straight to discussion without identifying the root cause of the issue. There is only one difficulty with that approach – the issue is merely a symptom of what is truly happening. If you start discussing right away, you will most likely solve the wrong issue.

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